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NORTHERN CONSTELLATIONS 2017

2017 NC Web Banner-Generic (2)

Overview


On April 21 and 22, Northern Constellations 2017 welcomed the largest group of NOSM faculty in the school’s history to our Sixth Annual Faculty Development Conference. The diverse program featured three plenary sessions exploring key concepts relevant to health professional education: Improving our clinical and educational activity through a culture of quality; Providing leadership as we move towards integrating health care with education, research, and scholarly pursuits; along with the Professional development of the empathetic self.

A wide variety of interactive workshops provided attendees with multiple opportunities to address their personal learning needs in the areas of teaching and preceptoring, scholarly and research activities, leadership, and health care professional wellness and resiliency.  New conference initiatives included educational innovations where NOSM faculty, staff, and learners showcased their recent work along with fireside chats where attendees informally conversed with our plenary speakers.

Friday Night Dinner Ceremonies recognized outstanding faculty achievements through Peer Awards of Excellence and Promotions. Throughout the two day conference, formal and informal networking activities provided attendees with opportunities to converse, collaborate, and connect.

To view the conference program, click here

Conference Presentations

Continue your Northern Constellations 2017 learning experiences by accessing plenary and workshop presentations and resources.


Plenary Session 1:  Improving and transforming our health care system through a culture of quality

Presenter: Jeff Turnbull MD, FRCPC (Health Quality Ontario)

Although Ontario has a comparatively well-resourced health care system, it often falls short in meeting our health care needs along with being financially unsustainable in its present format. Efforts to improve and transform our health care system have been piece meal, limited in scope and focused on cost containment. Using quality as a driver to improve health outcomes and provide better patient experiences results in changes that are sustainable and cost effective. Key to improvements are clinical leadership and health care provider engagement.


Learning Objectives:

  1. Define the key drivers of health care system change.
  2. Describe the components of a culture of quality within health care.
  3. Identify the importance of clinical engagement, innovation and leadership to improve health outcomes. 

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Plenary Session 2: Leadership within healthcare transformation

Presenter: Margaret Steele MD, Med, FRCPS (Faculty of Medicine Memorial University of Newfoundland)

In the current environment of significant healthcare transformation, there is a growing recognition that there is a critical need for clinicians to be involved in leadership. Physicians and health care providers play an important role as both formal and informal leaders in healthcare transformation due to their expertise and experience. Understanding their roles and ways in which they can work collaboratively with their administrative counterparts to enhance healthcare delivery will be discussed.


Learning Objectives:

  1. Describe the rationale for health care provider leadership in healthcare transformation.
  2. Define formal, informal, transactional, and transformational leadership.
  3. Discuss factors contributing to an effective health care provider-administrator dyad.

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Plenary Session 3: Professional development of the empathetic self: Reflection, dialogue, and humanistic medical education

Presenter: Arno Kumagai MD (Faculty of Medicine University of Toronto)

Although much time and discussion in medical education is devoted to medical ethics and professionalism, only rarely do we think about the moral dimensions of health care professional training. The role of education with a humanistic intent is to teach physicians to practice with excellence, compassion and justice. Participants will explore how dialogue and reflection may serve to enhance the transformation of students and residents into empathic health care professionals.


Learning Objectives:

  1. Recognize that medical education is moral education.
  2. Describe the role of reflection and dialogue in the development of the empathic professional.
  3. Identify the conditions in which transformative learning may be achieved.

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A1: Leading quality improvement within Northern Ontario clinical and educational settings

Presenters: Jeff Turnbull MD, FRCPC (Health Quality Ontario); Reena Dhatt MD, CCFP, FCFP (Associate Professor); Jon Johnsen MD, CCFP (Assistant Professor)

Northern Ontario has a high burden of disease with the highest Ontario rates of cancer, diabetes, substance abuse, cardiovascular and respiratory disease. With 87% of Ontario’s landmass and 6% of the population, there are both strengths and challenges for implementing a culture of quality improvement. NOSM faculty have a pivotal role in preparing future health care professionals by role modeling as clinicians and teachers the principles of QI in both their clinical and educational settings.


Learning Objectives:

  1. Describe Northern Ontario quality priorities, strengths, and challenges.
  2. Discuss strategies for role modeling and teaching quality with undergraduate and postgraduate learners.
  3. Identify three key actions that would operationalize a quality agenda for Northern Ontario.

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A7:  Aligning LEADS leadership framework with the CanMEDS competencies

Presenters: Andrea Reibmayr MAL, CEC, CHE, ACC; Robert Barnett MA (Assistant Professor)

LEADS in a caring environment framework encompasses key skills, behaviours, abilities and knowledge required to lead in all aspects of the health system. The framework presents a common understanding of what good leadership looks like and is based on the principle that caring leaders through compassion and support build a more effective health system. Participants will explore LEADS domains of Lead Self, Engage Others, Achieve results, Develop Coalitions and Systems Transformation along with its applicability to CanMEDS competencies.


Learning Objectives:

  1. Examine the five domains of the LEADS leadership framework.
  2. Discuss the applicability of the LEADS framework to the CanMEDS competencies.
  3. Demonstrate the utility of the LEADS domains in the creation of leadership development activities.

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A8:  Teaching Phase 1 Structured Clinical Skills

Presenters: David Allen MD, CCFP(EM), FCFP (Associate Professor); Tamara Boyd BA


Workshop is aimed at current Structured Clinical Skills (SCS) tutors, faculty considering teaching SCS and ICE preceptors interested in knowing more about the SCS Phase 1 Program. Structure and rational of SCS Program will be discussed and role of standardized patients in teaching clinical skills will be reviewed. Opportunities will be provided for current SCS tutors and faculty interested in teaching clinical skills to preclinical learners to exchange teaching strategies along with approaches for commonly encountered learner issues.


Learning Objectives:

  1. Discuss strategies for dealing effectively with some common issues that arise in Phase 1 SCS sessions.
  2. Examine roles and capabilities of standardized patients along with strategies to use them effectively in enhancing clinical skills instruction.

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B1: Surviving and thriving in your first five years and beyond

Presenters: Jessica Beaton MD, CCFP (Assistant Professor); Kim Varty MD, CCFP (Assistant Professor)

The first five years of practice can be challenging. There is lots to learn as one transitions from residency to independent practice. Physicians from a variety of clinical settings and different stages in their careers will share valuable experiences. Common issues including practice management, medico legal concerns, physician resiliency, and faculty engagement will be addressed. Through discussions with peers, participants will normalize some of the predictable issues faced as new physicians in the North.


Learning Objectives:

  1. Examine common challenges faced by physicians in their first five years of practice.
  2. Describe strategies to optimize resilience for practice in the North.
  3. Identify one approachable physician colleague to join your support network. 

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B3: Principles and practice of mentorship: A learning relationship for both mentee and mentor

Presenter: Margaret Steele MD Med, FRCPS (Faculty of Medicine Memorial University of Newfoundland)

Mentoring benefits the academic productivity of individual faculty as well the institution. However, mentors and mentees are often not well prepared to take on their important roles. The relationship between a mentor and mentee is reciprocal, dynamic and collaborative with the essence of the interaction that of a learning relationship. Participants will engage in facilitated interactive small group discussions in order to learn effective ways to meaningful engage in mentoring relationships.


Learning Objectives:

  1. Define the roles of the mentor and mentee.
  2. Outline the characteristics of an effective mentoring relationship.
  3. Describe the principles of establishing and effective mentoring relationship.

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B4: Identifying the struggling learner and implementing remediation strategies – Part 1

Presenter: Chris Kupsh MD, CCFP(EM), FCFP (Associate Professor)

Supervising a struggling learner can be challenging for all! Although preceptors usually recognize a struggling learner, several barriers exist when addressing this problem. Two of the most important issues include “Failure to Fail” both from individual preceptor and institutional perspectives as well as diagnosing and defining the problem(s). Using a framework can help identify issues and lay the groundwork for planning educational interventions which are essential in supporting a learner’s successful completion of their training program.


Learning Objectives:

  1. Describe the challenges/barriers encountered when supervising a struggling learner.
  2. Demonstrate strategies for early identification of a struggling learner.
  3. Apply a framework to develop a differential diagnosis and define the problem(s) for a struggling learner.

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B5: Research 101.2: A NOSM toolbox of resources to support your research project

Presenters: Sophie Regalado MA (Lecturer), MISt; Penny Moody-Corbett PhD (Professor); Ghislaine Pilot-Attema BEd, MA

You have a clear research question with an appropriate design. What’s next? Assembling a research team with a skill set to accomplish all aspects of the project including funding applications, research ethics board approvals, data collection and analysis along with dissemination of findings is crucial. Participants will be guided through the process of identifying research team roles and avenues for collaboration. Resources available to NOSM faculty members and health researchers in Northern Ontario will be introduced.


Learning Objectives:

  1. Generate a list of team member roles for a research project.
  2. Access appropriate resources at NOSM to answer research project questions or get support.
  3. Select self-directed resources at NOSM to contextualize research, locate tools and identify collaborators

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B7: The why, what and how of Integrated Community Experience (ICE) 108/110 placements

Presenters: Jeff Bachiu MEd; Frances Kilbertus MD, MMedEd, FCFP (Associate Professor); Cheri Bethune MD, MClSc, FCFP (Professor); Stephen Chiang MD, MBA, CCFP (Assistant Professor)

What are the knowledge, skills and attitudes we want students to achieve in their ICE placement? How do we create learning experiences that foster achievement of these objectives? Students want ICE to enhance their preparation for clerkship while preceptors envision an experience to better understand primary care in small communities. ICE placement structure will be reviewed along with highlighting important curriculum changes to both course objectives and methods of assessment.


Learning Objectives:

  1. Describe general logistics and structure of ICE 108/110 placements.
  2. Organize an effective environment to optimize clinical workplace learning for ICE 108/110 placements.
  3. Utilize skills in basic learner assessment strategies to foster student learning.

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B8: Success and Happiness: Strategies for finding success by focusing first on your happiness

Presenter: Ramamohan Veluri MD, DPM, MRCPsych, FRCPC (Associate Professor)

Most of us do not clearly understand the concepts of success and happiness. People understand them differently and they change over time depending upon life circumstances. Understanding the relationship between success and happiness leads to a clearer view of self and the future, leading to a more fulfilled life. Strategies for the pursuit of happiness including self-reflection and life goal clarification will be discussed. Importance of intentional activities that promote long term health and well-being will be reviewed.


Learning Objectives:

  1. Describe the concepts of success and happiness.
  2. Demonstrate the relationship between success and happiness.
  3. Identify strategies to promote individual well-being through intentional activities. 

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C1: Hidden agenda of competency based assessment: Developing physicians motivated to improve their performance

Presenter: Ivy Oandasan MD, MHSc, CCFP, FCFP (College of Family Physicians of Canada)

With Triple C and Competency By Design, preceptors are asking “What do I have to do that is different?” Competency based medical education (CBME) requires a culture shift in education where it safe for learners to self-assess and share what they think they know or do not know with their preceptors. The goal of CBME is a generation of family physicians capable and willing to self-assess with guidance; involved in medical practice based on continuous quality improvement, evidence informed medicine and patient safety.


Learning Objectives:

  1. Assess educational theories that under lie the premise of competency based medical education.
  2. Appraise CFPC CBME tools for Resident Feedback and the Competency Coach (Fundamental Teaching Activities Framework).
  3. Demonstrate strategies to further develop CBME preceptors individually and collectively at NOSM.

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C3: Looking after self to better lead others and improve health care

Presenters: Andrea Reibmayr MAL, CEC, CHE, ACC; Robert Barnett MA (Assistant Professor)

All leaders regardless of their role in the health system must be able to lead themselves. The LEADS domain of Lead Self, aligns with CanMEDS competencies of Communicator, Collaborator, Leader, Scholar and Health Advocate. Being self-aware, managing self, developing self, and demonstrating character are capabilities associated with emotional intelligence that enable leaders to manage emotions, build relationships, make decisions, become more resilient and create positive work environments. Leadership necessitates self-awareness and personal mastery which require ongoing reflection and practice.


Learning Objectives:

  1. Demonstrate how increased self-awareness can enhance capacity for leadership.
  2. Appraise the intra- and inter-personal aspects of emotional intelligence associated with leadership.
  3. Examine strength-based personal assessment and appreciative inquiry as tools in leadership development.

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C4: Patient Safety, professionalism and you

Presenters: Lee Toner MD, CCFP(EM), FCFP (Associate Professor); James Goertzen MD, MClSc, CCFP, FCFP (Professor); Catherine Cervin MD, MAEd, FCFP (Professor); Jennifer Fawcett BA, MPH

Teaching professional behavior and addressing professional lapses is essential for safe patient care. Recent conceptualization of the relationship between health care professional identity formation and professionalism provides a framework for the development of relevant educational activities for teaching professionalism. Through case based scenarios and role play, participants will explore how learners, faculty, health care team members and educational staff all have a role to play in supporting safe professional learning and working environments.


Learning Objectives:

  1. Demonstrate the relationship between professional identify formation and professionalism.
  2. Identify tools and strategies to support professional identify formation of both students and residents.

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C7: Staying up to date in between patient encounters using the Internet, medical apps and social media resources

Presenter: Stephen Morgan BMBS, CCFP (Assistant Professor)

Staying up to date while involved in clinical activities can be challenging. New and emerging technologies to access the best evidence based resources can be valuable in supporting both clinical and teaching activities. Different web-based resources will be highlighted with a focus on the time and effort required to use them. Searchable internet resources, podcasts, social media, smartphone apps and alerts, as well as daily evidence-based summaries in your inbox will be covered.


Learning Objectives:

  1. Examine various web-based resources including time and effort required to access them.
  2. Utilize web-based resources for quick evidence-based searches.

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D1: Teaching for transformation: Teaching for compassion and social justice

Presenter: Arno Kumagai MD (Faculty of Medicine University of Toronto)

Teaching and learning topics of social relevance in medicine such as professionalism, medical ethics, the doctor-patient relationship, global health, and social justice; requires learning that is active and imaginative. This demands engagement of the whole person, collaboration, and risk-taking by both teachers and learners. Education in these areas involves the fostering of critical consciousness of the self, others, and the world and is stimulated by small group discussions, stories of patients and their families, readings, essays, and creative art.


Learning Objectives:

  1. Examine the meanings of empathy and reflection including their role in health professional education and clinical practice.
  2. Build on participants combined experience as teachers and learners to broaden and deepen discussions of critical consciousness and transformative education.
  3. Discuss impact of dialogical educational approaches to promote the development of health care professionals.

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D2: Teaching with Technology: Delivering academic sessions through a virtual classroom

Presenters: Christina Graves HBa, BEd; John Dabous BSc, MSc; Lee Rysdale, MEd, RD (Assistant Professor); Steve Kelly, ITIL

Faculty often present and facilitate academic sessions where groups of learners are not all present in the same location. This requires use of distance technologies including teleconference, videoconference, WebEx, Adobe Connect and others. Familiarity with capabilities and limitations of newer distance educational technologies is important. Presenters will review important technological features and provide participants with strategies and hands on experience to optimize use of technology to engage your learners regardless of physical location.


Learning Objectives:

  1. Describe the benefits and pitfalls of delivering academic sessions using virtual classrooms.
  2. Implement effective teaching and learning approaches to engage learners when using virtual classrooms and distance technologies.

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D3: Faculty engagement: Motivating our colleagues to say “I do”?

Presenter: Barb Zelek MD, CCFP, FCFP (Associate Professor)

Engaging faculty can be challenging for training programs with a distributed educational model. Addressing these challenges is important as engaged faculty positively impact patient care, educational programming, scholarly activity and medical leadership. Highly performing medical schools enable faculty to excel in their various roles. Literature on employee and physician engagement along with a behavioral sciences motivational framework will be discussed. Participants will have an opportunity to apply these principles and formulate strategies to engage their colleagues.


Learning Objectives:

  1. Describe principles and factors that influence faculty engagement.
  2. Formulate strategies to engage faculty colleagues within various settings

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D4: Identifying the struggling learner and implementing remediation strategies – Part 2

Presenter: Chris Kupsh MD, CCFP(EM), FCFP (Associate Professor)

Supervising a struggling learner can be challenging for all! Identifying, diagnosing and defining the problem(s) are only the first steps. Setting up educational goals and objectives, designing a remediation plan along with implementing remediation strategies and activities can seem daunting and overwhelming. Steps involved in planning and developing a remediation intervention tailored to the struggling learner will be explored. Accessing resources to support both preceptor and learner are an essential component of all remediation plans.


Learning Objectives:

  1. Identify and apply practical strategies in planning, developing and implementing a tailored remediation intervention.
  2. Identify and access available resources to assist in planning, development, evaluation and implementation of remediation plans.

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D5: Research 101.4: Successfully disseminating your research findings and results

Presenters: Suzanne Lemieux PhD (Sudbury District Health Unit); Joanne Beyers MA, RD (Sudbury District Health Unit) Lecturer) ; Renee St Onge MA (Sudbury District Health Unit) (Lecturer); Marion Maar PhD (Associate Professor); Jack Haggarty MD, FRCPC (Professor); Sophie Regalado MA, MISt (Lecturer)

Only a fraction of knowledge is effectively mobilized (shared, used, and applied) to support progress in the field of study along with informing further research, policy and practice. This lack of knowledge transfer hinders both innovation and progress. Participants will be provided with skills and tools to enable the efficient and appropriate dissemination, uptake and application of knowledge. Thoughtful inclusion of the key steps of planning, implementing and evaluating knowledge mobilization strategies will be discussed.


Learning Objectives:

  1. Describe the steps in planning, implementing, and evaluating knowledge mobilization strategies.
  2. Identify barriers and enablers to using and sharing evidence in different contexts and among different target audiences.
  3. Demonstrate strategies to collect, collate and package evidence in a way that makes it accessible and relevant to users.

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D6: Competency Based Medical Education Personalized Learning Blocks: A resident centred educational activity

Presenters: Rya Boscariol MD, FRCPC (Assistant Professor); Sara Cover BSM

In Competency Based Medical Education (CBME), there an emphasis on residents owning their education by becoming better CanMEDS scholars and paying attention to principles of adult education and life-long learning. CBME emphasizes personal learning trajectories and increases the responsibility of learners in advocating for their personal learning needs. NOSM’s Anesthesiology Specialty Program introduced Personalized Learning Blocks (PLB) as an opportunity for residents to monitor their own performance and negotiate objectives aligned with program defined expectations for achieving competency.


Learning Objectives:

  1. Describe purpose of the PLB as a resident centred educational activity in CBME.
  2. Select methods to assist learners in identifying their learning needs and develop specific objectives to address identified needs.
  3. Identify tools to assist in formulating a PLB within participant’s educational setting.

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D7: Movin’ on up: An introduction to the NOSM joint and stipendiary Faculty promotions process

Presenters: Anil Joseph MD, FRCPC (Associate Professor); Maurianne Reade MD, CCFP(EM), FCFP (Associate Professor); Anita Arella MA

Thinking about being promoted at NOSM but not sure where to start or what questions to ask? Join us for an orientation to NOSM Promotions Policy along with a review of the promotions process. The pivotal role that documentation provided by applicants has on the review process will be highlighted along with strategies to streamline the application process. Tips along with recommend ways that applicants can increase their chances for success in seeking promotion will be discussed.


Learning Objectives:

  1. Identify essential elements of a successful promotion application at each level from Assistant Professor to Professor.
  2. Define specific requirements for promotion to aid in successful applications or determine if appropriate to presently seek promotion.

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