About NOSM Education Research Communities

Sudbury Curriculum

The two-year curriculum consists of block time in Family Medicine and a series of community and hospital-based rotations throughout northern Ontario. The following is an outline of the present curriculum. The rotation schedule is created with the participation of many different communities.

 

Year 1

 # of Weeks 

Year 2

# of Weeks

Family Medicine

16

Family Medicine **

16

Rural Family Medicine

8

Rural Family Medicine

8

Medicine

4

Medicine

8

Pediatrics

4

Emergency

4

Psychiatry

4

Pediatrics

4

Emergency

4

Obstetrics & Gynecology **

8

Surgery

4

Elective

4

Obstetrics & Gynecology

4

 

 

Elective

4

 

 

** Please note that the Family Medicine and Obstetrics/Gynecology rotation have a 4-week optional selective.

 

View Rotation Schedule 

 Family Medicine

The block time experience in Family Medicine will take place in the community practices of the preceptors to which the residents are assigned. These community practices have been selected from the region of northern Ontario. Each resident will spend 16 weeks of block time with the same preceptor. They will provide continuous care to their own patients within the practice, as well as participating in the care of all in-hospital patients from the practice. In effect, the residents work with their preceptors in all that they do.

The Family Medicine RoCS program offers the unique opportunity for hospital-based training in an environment where there are few other house staff present. This allows for increased hands-on experience for the residents and provides the opportunity for continuous first call coverage in all specialty areas.

Northern Ontario is a popular location for undergraduate learners to complete elective and core rotations. There are a growing number of opportunities for residents to develop their teaching and mentoring skills in collaboration with the undergraduate students of the Northern Ontario School of Medicine (NOSM) and other medical schools from Ontario and the rest of Canada.

Elective Rotations

Four weeks of elective time in each year provide flexibility of individual training programs, and enables the residents to tailor their training to suit the needs of the community in which they plan to practice. Residents may choose elective experiences outside northern Ontario.

Diversity of experience during elective rotations is encouraged and recognised as being extremely valuable. The Family Medicine RoCS program maintains close ties with various medical schools in Australia and elective opportunities are very easy to arrange. An exchange program with Monash University is currently under development.

Selectives

All Selectives must be taken within the accepted geographic limits of the Program.
There are two opportunities to do Selectives during your second academic year.

During the second year, the last 4-week block of the 16-week Family Medicine rotation may be chosen as a selective in which case the resident may choose to do an additional core rotation in one of the disciplines listed below.
It is not compulsory to take a selective but is only offered as an option to increase curriculum flexibility in meeting your educational needs.

The second opportunity for a Selective is also available to you during your second block of obstetrics. You can choose Northern Ontario rotations from the following list:

  • Internal Medicine
  • Surgery and any of its sub-specialties
  • Pediatrics
  • Reproductive and Women’s Health
  • Emergency Medicine
  • Dermatology
  • Anesthesia
  • Palliative Care

Rotation Sites

The clinical rotations in Family Medicine and in the specialty disciplines provide experiences in active community-based teaching practices. Communities combine spectacular scenery with a wide array of recreational opportunities which gives balance to resident responsibilities and provides an opportunity to explore the northern lifestyle. Outdoor sporting activities available include water sports, cross-country and downhill skiing, snowmobiling, mountain biking, hiking, fishing, etc.

Currently, community rotations take place in:

 

 Bracebridge
 Cochrane
 Elliot Lake
 Engelhart
 Espanola
 Gore Bay
 Haileybury
 Hearst
 Hunstville
 Iroquois Falls
 Kapuskasing
 Kirkland Lake
 Little Current
 Mattawa
 Mindemoya
 New Liskeard
 North Bay
 Parry Sound
 Powassan
 Richard’s Landing
 Sault Ste. Marie
 Sturgeon Falls
 Sudbury
 Temagami
 Timmins

Teaching sites are not dependent on residents for service.

This results in an appropriate balance of learning opportunities and patient care responsibilities. Within all clinical rotations, residents are encouraged to identify personal goals and work together with their preceptor in attaining them. Family medicine sites provide residents with an opportunity to work with preceptors in fee for service, salary, alternative payment plans, or community contract practices.

Academic Programming

Educational activities consist of seminars, supervised hospital ward rounds, and direct supervision during office sessions. Residents work with other allied health professionals, and learn the appropriate use of community resources and consultants in the provision of quality care to patients.

A series of academic rounds is presented at the end of each four week block throughout the residency. These presentations are resident-focused, and highly evidence-based. They cover a wide range of clinical topics as well as sessions dealing with practice management, family medicine ethics, and professional organization issues. Resident's travel costs to attend these rounds are covered. All residents must have their own vehicle. 

One of the most important aspects of postgraduate medical education is the fostering of skills in self-directed learning and the promotion of evidence-based clinical practice. Critical to this is the understanding and appreciation of excellence in research. Techniques associated with evidence-based medicine (EBM) and evidence-based learning (EBL) will be incorporated into learning activities and Grand Rounds.

All residents in both programs meet biannually for pan-northern retreats. These weekend long sessions spotlight four different northern focussed themes including;

  • Aboriginal Culture and Spirituality
  • Francophone Culture
  • Mines and Mills/Occupational Health
  • Wilderness Medicine

This programming rotates annually, such that over the two-year program, resident have the opportunity to attend all four sessions. The pan-northern retreats offer interactive learning, guest speakers and unique content specifically suited to practicing medicine in the north.

Computers and distance education telecommunication facilities link the many components of our teaching network. A project has recently begun in which the cost of a PDA is shared between the resident and the program. This device offers a phone/computer combination loaded with medical software and mobile wireless data services. The goal of this project is to maintain communication between the learner and the program, support multimedia tools, and collect procedural logbook data.

Library resources are available electronically through the Northern Ontario Virtual Library and the Northern Ontario School of Medicine’s Health Information Resource Centre.

Research

Residents are required to complete a research project as part of the core component of the residency program. Satisfactory completion of a research project, including an oral presentation and written paper are compulsory in order to fulfill the requirements of the program. The research team will provide guidance and feedback of the residents' research projects throughout the two year training program.

The goals of the research project are to stimulate an inquiring and thoughtful approach to medical practice, to apply the fundamentals of other components of the program such as critical appraisal and chart audit as learned in the core curriculum, and to study a question or topic that is relevant and meaningful to the resident and to family medicine.

The program offers flexibility in the definition of the project and offers help with problem formulation, ethics approval, writing, data management, and presentation. Residents may work together on their projects, as long as the project justifies the involvement of more than one researcher.

Resident Tracking

The Family Medicine RoCS program includes a mandatory component of computer-based tracking for a specific set of procedures for all residents. Tracking of procedures enables the program to ensure that teaching is occurring and leading to meaningful acquisition of skills. When timely tracking data is submitted by all residents, periodic summaries may be produced that allow the resident to compare the number of procedures they have completed relative to their peers. Also, completion of this part of the program will allow residents to carefully document their performance. It is anticipated that this information will be helpful to residents in licensing and credentialling procedures later in their career.

Application Information

Interested individuals in their final year of medical school should apply to the Family Medicine RoCS Program through the Canadian Residency Matching Service (CARMS) at www.carms.ca.

 

 

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